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978-688-6999

Scientific research shows connection between gluten and peripheral neuropathy.

"A review of all published studies from 1964 to 2000 (single and multiple case reports) of patients with established celiac disease who then developed neurological illness showed that the most common neurological manifestations were ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. The third most common entity was myopathy."
Muscle Nerve, 2007 Apr; 35(4):443-50

"Although neurological manifestations in patients with established coeliac disease have been reported since 1966, it was not until 30 years later that, in some individuals, gluten sensitivity was shown to manifest solely with neurological dysfunction."
"Most patients who present with neurological manifestations of gluten sensitivity have no gastrointestinal symptoms."
Lancet Neurol 2010; 9:318-30

"Gluten sensitivity should be considered as a state of heightened immunologic responsiveness to ingested gluten proteins in genetically predisposed individuals. The brain seems to be particularly vulnerable."
Pediatrics Vol. 108 No.2, August 2001

"The neurological manifestations of gluten sensitivity are commonly seen in patients over the age of 50 years"
Muscle Nerve, 2007 Apr;35(4):443-50

"…as with other neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's Disease and Alzheimer's Disease, the disease process (of Gluten Sensitivity) can remain under the surface and unrecognized for several years before the threshold of clinical manifestations is reached."
Lancet 358; August 11, 2001:461-467


"Of 620 patients with celiac disease, retrospective data obtained from our hospital found 263 neurological and psychiatric conditions occurring in 189 of them" (30%)
Postgrad. Med. J. 2002;78;393-398

"The range of neurological conditions associated with coeliac disease includes cerebellar ataxia, ataxia with myoclonus, peripheral neuropathy, myopathy, myelopathy, dementia, epilepsy with occipital calcifications, mononeuropathy multiplex, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and vasculitis of the CNS."
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1997;63:770-775

"We conclude that the spectrum of neurological disorders in patients with CD is wider than previously appreciated and includes, in addition to previously known entities such as cerebellar ataxia, epilepsy, or neuromuscular disease, milder and more common problems such as migraine headache, and learning disabilities, including ADHD."
Pediatrics Vol. 113, No. 6, June 2004

"Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy constitute the most common neurological manifestation of celiac disease"
ARCH NEUROL Vol 62, Oct 2005

"A review of all published studies from 1964 to 2000 (single and multiple case reports) of patients with established celiac disease who then developed neurological illness showed that the most common neurological manifestations were ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. The third most common entity was myopathy."
Muscle Nerve, 2007 Apr; 35(4):443-50

Celiac disease was found in 5% of patients with symptoms of neuropathy and normal electrodiagnostic studies, making CD an important diagnostic consideration in the evaluation of "small fiber" or idiopathic sensory neuropathies"
CMLS, Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 62 (2005) 791-799

Peripheral neuropathy is the second commonest [neurological] manifestation of gluten sensitivity. Prospective screening of 101 patients with idiopathic peripheral neuropathy has shown the prevalence of gluten sensitivity to be 40% (unpublished data). The commonest type of peripheral neuropathy we encountered is sensorimotor axonal (26) followed by mononeuropathy multiplex (15), pure motor neuropathy (10), small fibre neuropathy (four) and mixed axonal and demyelinating (two). The neuropathy is usually chronic and of gradual progression. Patients with a pure motor neuropathy may progress to involvement of sensory fibres. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2002;72:560-563 doi:10.1136/jnnp.72.5.560

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